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Celebrate International Tiger Day and Meet our Malayan Tigers

July 29 is International Tiger Day and we invite you to come celebrate with us at the Malayan tiger exhibit in Cat Canyon. We will have special activities and presentations occurring throughout the day from 10:00am to 3:00pm, including opportunities to learn about tigers and conservation from our zookeepers and interpretive staff.

Taj and Who-Dey lounging in the sun (Photo: Michelle Curley)

Taj and Who-Dey lounging in the sun (Photo: Michelle Curley)

Meet our Malayan tiger brothers, Taj and Who-Dey! When Cat Canyon opened in 2012, the Zoo teamed up with the Cincinnati Bengals to help conserve these beautiful animals. Who-Dey was named by Cincinnati Bengals fans and Taj was named by Zoo supporters. The brothers, who turn seven on July 30, often come up close to the viewing glass at their exhibit. They enjoy relaxing in the pool, especially on sunny days, and getting meaty treats from their keepers during daily presentations for the public.

Through the glass (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Through the glass (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Taj and Who-Dey lounging in the pool (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Taj and Who-Dey lounging in the pool (Photo: Kathy Newton)

The Malayan tiger is one of the smallest of the six tiger subspecies, ranging from about 220 pounds to 400 pounds. Native to Malaysia and southern Thailand, it preys on deer, wild pigs and cattle, and has been known to travel up to 20 miles in search of prey. The orange-and-black stripes provide excellent camouflage in the forests where they live. Tigers also have white spots on the back of their ears, which are surrounded by black fur and give the appearance of false eyes.  This is another form of camouflage, giving the impression that they are staring right at potential intruders when its back is turned.

White spots on back of tiger's eyes

White spots on back of tiger’s eyes

The Zoo is committed to ensuring the survival of endangered tigers of which there are fewer than 3,200 remaining in the wild. Over the next three years, we have pledged to support the tiger conservation efforts of Panthera. Panthera is the leading international wild cat conservation organization with a mission to ensure the future of wild cats through scientific leadership and global conservation action. 

Panthera logo

To ensure the tiger’s survival, Panthera works across Asia with numerous partners to end the poaching of tigers for the illegal wildlife trade, prevent tiger deaths due to conflict with humans and livestock, and protect tiger prey species and habitat. Through their program, Tigers Forever, Panthera works to protect and secure key tiger populations and ensure connectivity between sites so that tigers can live long into the future.

Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, CEO of Panthera, a global wild cat conservation organization, installs a camera trap in Bhutan. (Photo: Steve Winter)

Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, CEO of Panthera, a global wild cat conservation organization, installs a camera trap in Bhutan. (Photo: Steve Winter)

“When it comes to saving tigers, nobody gets results like Dr. Alan Rabinowitz and his team at Panthera. It is a crying shame that tigers are being illegally poached for their skin and bones, but by inspiring our visitors to the Cincinnati Zoo and partnering with Panthera, we remain dedicated to our belief that there is still room in this world for great cats.” – Thane Maynard, Cincinnati Zoo Director

Taj and Who-Dey hope to see you at the Zoo on International Tiger Day!

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