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Category — Cats

Cinco de Gato: Eat, Drink and Help Save Ocelots in Texas!

More commonly found in Central and South America, a small endangered population of about 80 ocelots still roams the thorny brush habitats found on ranchlands and the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in South Texas. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect the Texas ocelot, and the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the American Association of Zoo Keepers (AAZK) invites you to help support their efforts by joining us for our first annual Cinco de Gato fundraising event!

Cinco de Gato logo

This Friday on May 8 between 5:00pm and 11:00pm, join us at Barrio Tequileria in Northside (3937 Spring Grove Ave). Barrio Tequileria has generously offered to donate a portion of food and drink sales during the event to the cause. Cincinnati Magazine recently recognized Barrio Tequileria as having one of Cincinnati’s top outdoor dining patios. You can even bring your dogs!

Barrio Logo with phone

If you come early, you might get the chance to meet a special animal ambassador, and later in the evening there will be live music. We’ll be selling Cinco de Gato merchandise, including t-shirts, shot glasses and magnets painted by the Zoo’s ocelot ambassadors, Sihil and Santos. There will also be a piñata raffle and face painting. The event is sure to be fun for all ages!

Sihil, one of the Zoo's ocelot ambassadors, really puts her whole body into her art! You can purchase magnets painted by Sihil at Cinco de Gato.

Sihil, one of the Zoo’s ocelot ambassadors, really puts her whole body into her art! You can purchase magnets painted by Sihil at Cinco de Gato.

Cinco de Gato t-shirts and magnets painted by the Zoo's ocelots are among the merchandise that will be for sale at the event.

Cinco de Gato t-shirts and magnets painted by the Zoo’s ocelots are among the merchandise that will be for sale at the event.

Admission to the event is free! Funds raised will support Texas ocelot conservation through the Friends of Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. So come on out for some great fun, food and drinks!

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May 6, 2015   No Comments

Mini-Maynard Spring Break Camp 90-Second Mini-Naturalist videos

As part of their Cincinnati Zoo Spring Break Camp experience, our 2015 Mini-Maynard Training Camp participants scripted, recorded, and edited their very own 90-Second Mini-Naturalist videos to promote awareness and/or raise funds for the Cincinnati Zoo’s hippo exhibit, Go Bananas! campaign, and Maasai Lions and Livelihood bracelets. Click on each hyperlink to view the final results of their hard work. Good job campers!

April 15, 2015   No Comments

The Importance of CREW’s Domestic Cat Research

Guest blogger: Zoo Academy student, Jane Collins

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) is famously known to the world for its hard work on saving endangered plants and animals. Whenever people learn about CREW, they hear about the projects on polar bears, Sumatran rhinos, wild cats, and many plant species including autumn buttercup, four-petal pawpaw, and Avon Park harebells. You learn a lot about how important these projects are, but I believe there is one important aspect of CREW that is not as well known to Zoo visitors as it should be. I’ll give you a hint, re-read the title!

That’s right. I’m talking about cats. I don’t mean the wild African lion, cheetah, or tiger that you may have been thinking about. I mean domestic cats. CREW’s Domestic Cat Research is actually important to saving endangered big cats in the wild. These special cats help CREW with a number of things, including testing a contraceptive vaccine and conducting oviductal artificial inseminations and embryo transfers.

Three of the CREW cats - Taneshia, Beth and Paige

Three of the CREW cats – Taneshia, Beth and Paige

The cats in this program are given vaccines for common diseases and are spayed and neutered when at the appropriate age so they are completely cared for. CREW volunteers take the time to socialize with the cats also so they are very affectionate cats and are never neglected.

As a Zoo Academy student, I personally have had the opportunity to spend time with the cats and see up close how well they are treated.  Washing cat dishes, litter pans, animal carriers, and a few other responsibilities may have not been the finest experience, but I liked that I was making even the smallest contribution to the care of the cats. I also was able to spend quality time with most of the cats playing and relaxing, whichever the cats preferred for the day.  I had a great time learning a few of the cats’ individual personalities. One cat physically demands love and affection by climbing right into your lap. Another is very vocal. And another cat even loves water.

My favorite cat was a three-year old grey tabby with black stripes. He was the largest male domestic cat I have ever seen and looked like he belonged deep in a dark jungle rather than at a zoo. At end of my time at CREW, he was up for adoption. I couldn’t bring myself to part with him and decided to take him home. His new name is officially Chaz. He likes to follow me around EVERY square inch of my house and cries when I’ve gone too long without petting him. He is a loving member of my family. It is very cool to have a cat from the Cincinnati Zoo that has contributed to research that helps to save endangered wild cats.

Me and Chaz, a cat I adopted from CREW

Me and Chaz, a cat I adopted from CREW

April 8, 2015   1 Comment