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Category — Conservation

Passenger Pigeon Commemoration Gaining Momentum

We’ve been busy! Here’s an update on various projects and events we’ve been working on surrounding the commemoration of the centennial of the passenger pigeon’s extinction on September 1:

Passenger Pigeon Memorial Renovation

The Passenger Pigeon Memorial itself is of historic importance.  Built for the September 18, 1875 opening of the Zoo, it is the last remaining in a series of seven rectangular pagoda-type, tile-roofed buildings connected by wire summer cages in a complex 320 feet long, known as the Aviary or “Old Bird Run.”  The center building, larger than the others, was more elaborate, with pediments on each facade, and a short square tower capped with a pseudo-onion dome.  The six smaller units of the Aviary were demolished in 1974-75.  The large central pavilion, which was the actual final home of Martha, was retained, moved about 50 feet northwest of its original location, and restored as the Passenger Pigeon Memorial, opening in 1977.  Collectively with the Zoo’s Reptile House – the nation’s oldest Zoo building – and the Elephant House, built in 1906, the Passenger Pigeon Memorial constitutes the Zoo’s designation as a National Historic Landmark.

Postcard showign the original bird aviaries

Postcard showing the original bird aviaries

A reproduction of John Ruthven’s recently completed painting of Martha – the Last Passenger Pigeon, will draw visitors’ attention from the main Zoo path. 

John Ruthven's painting of Martha, the last passenger pigeon, will welcome visitors into the new space.

John Ruthven’s painting of Martha, the last passenger pigeon, will welcome visitors into the new space.

Inside the building, updated lighting and ceiling treatment will brighten up the space.  All new interpretive signage will comprise flat wall panels featuring rich visual images and appropriate narrative.

Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Inside the Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Inside the Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

New walls ready for signage installation

New walls ready for signage installation

Putting the finishing touches on the restored doors

Putting the finishing touches on the restored doors

Artifacts such as a net and stool pigeon and wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by our own Gary Denzler will be presented in the exhibit as well.

The new exhibit will feature wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by Gary Denzler.

The new exhibit will feature wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by Gary Denzler.

The update will speak to the conservation of endangered species, using the story of the passenger pigeon as a lesson from the past for a sustainable future. First, it will explain the story of the passenger pigeon and its extinction, why it happened, and the scope of this loss. Next, the exhibit will describe how the passenger pigeon’s extinction was a wake-up call that spurred the conservation movement in America, highlighting the stories of native species that were nearly lost, such as white-tailed deer.  Then, the exhibit will present examples of species’ conservation efforts in which the Zoo is involved, including the Sumatran rhino and Autumn buttercup. Finally, the exhibition will invite visitors to get involved.

The interpretive installation has begun!

The interpretive installation has begun!

The dedication of the newly renovated exhibit will take place on September 1 beginning at 12:30.

Fold the Flock: Paper Pigeons

We are in the midst of a folding frenzy! Thousands of paper passenger pigeons are being folded by summer campers, visitors, staff and volunteers, which will be suspended from the ceiling of the Education Center at the Zoo later this month.

Hard at work folding pigeons

Hard at work folding pigeons

A pile of paper passenger pigeons!

A pile of paper passenger pigeons!

Paper passenger pigeons hanging in the Education Center lobby

Paper passenger pigeons hanging in the Education Center lobby

Add your pigeon to the flock! Download the foldable passenger pigeon template, print it off (double-sided, 11 X 17, full color is best) and fold it. Then send it or bring it to the Education Center at the Zoo to be hung with thousands of others before September 1.

Passenger Pigeon Memorial Weekend

Along with the Ohio Ornithological Society (OOS), the Zoo is hosting a Passenger Pigeon Weekend symposium at the Zoo on August 29 & 30. Friday night will be a “Martinis with Martha” fundraiser to benefit the Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) and the OOS Conservation Fund with food, drinks, live music and guest presentations. Saturday morning brings an assemblage of guest speakers with stories about lessons learned from the passenger pigeon, including Joel Greenberg (author of  A Feathered River Across the Sky), wildlife artist John Ruthven, Jim McCormac (author of Wild Ohio: The Best of our Natural Heritage) and Zoo Horticulturist Brian Jorg. And much, much more!

Registration is now open! Purchase your tickets here.

Barrows Conservation Lecture Series

On September 3, wildlife artist John Ruthven will speak as part of the Barrows Conservation Lecture Series at the Zoo. John Ruthven, naturalist, author, lecturer, and internationally acknowledged master of wildlife art, is often called the “20th Century Audubon.”

In 1974, John spearheaded the effort to save the last of the Zoo’s 19th Century bird pagoda’s – the one where “Martha,” the last of the passenger pigeons, had once lived. Through his leadership, and the sale of prints of his painting of “Martha,” the Zoo’s Passenger Pigeon Memorial was created.

John Ruthven with his painting, Martha - the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

John Ruthven with his painting, Martha – the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

Today, John has taken it a giant step forward, with his painting, “Martha – The Last Passenger Pigeon.” This print will be available for sale before and after his lecture. The price is $200.00. All prints are signed and numbered. The size is 30 x 20 inches.

Purchase tickets to John Ruthven’s lecture here.

To read the other posts in this series, click here.

August 25, 2014   No Comments

So What’s In A Name?

Last year the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, Zoo guests, friends, and followers celebrated the amazing effort that went into “Gladys” the gorilla’s surrogacy project. This work demonstrated the great lengths zoos will go to for their animals as well as the fantastic collaboration between institutions to do what is right and in the best interest of the animal.  This collaboration is the reason the Cincinnati Zoo selected the name Gladys – she was named after the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas, where she was born.  Staff is Brownsville selflessly transferred the orphaned one month old baby to Cincinnati because it was best for her. Read previous post about Gladys’ name…

With the birth of “Asha’s” #BabyGorilla on August 4th, we celebrate the even bigger picture of wild gorilla conservation.  Along with all the great work done for gorillas in the North America, the Cincinnati Zoo has participated in wild gorilla conversation for almost 20 years.  The Zoo’s primary focus has been partnering with the Nouabale Ndoki Project (NNP) in the Republic of Congo. The NNP includes the Mbeli Bai Study, the longest running study of the critically endangered wild western lowland gorilla.  Another important part of this work includes an area called Mondika (pronounced Mondeeka).  Here, gorillas are habituated for up close research and for eco tourism.  The Cincinnati Zoo recently helped facilitate the habitation of a second group of gorillas in Mondika and went into a three year agreement to continue the support, which includes habituating a third group.  Habituation is a very important part of the operation, providing keen insight into up close gorilla behavior while leaving people with the inspirational experience of seeing these magnificent animals in their natural habitats.

Part of the Cincinnati Zoo’s mission includes inspiring people with wildlife every day and what’s more inspiring than Asha’s new baby?  As we celebrated the great, collaborative,  work done in zoos with the name Gladys, we now celebrate wild gorillas and our efforts to help save them by naming Asha’s new baby “Mondika” .  If the baby turns out to be a boy, his nickname will be “Mondo”.  If the baby is a girl, her nickname will be “Mona”.   We’re really looking forward to watching our little gorilla ambassador grow up and welcome the opportunity to share stories from the wild through little Mondika for many years to come.  Stay tuned for the big “Mondo or Mona” announcement as soon as Asha allows us to have a peek!

August 8, 2014   1 Comment

Five Rhino Species Forever!

On Sunday, September 21, the Zoo will celebrate World Rhino Day. The Zoo is home to African black, Indian and Sumatran rhinos and is a leader in captive breeding and assisted reproductive techniques for rhino species here and abroad. We invite the Cincinnati community and our dedicated Zoo members to join us on World Rhino Day to celebrate our successes, learn about the challenges that rhinos face in the wild, and most importantly, partake in a fun-filled jam-packed day focused on the five species of rhino inhabiting our planet: African black, African white, Indian, Sumatran and Javan rhinos.

WRD Words

WRD LogoThe theme for World Rhino Day is “Five Rhino Species Forever”.  Stay tuned over the next month and a half as we countdown to World Rhino Day 2014 and blog about the special rhinos we have here at the Zoo and our efforts to conserve these magnificent animals and ensure there will be five rhino species forever!

August 7, 2014   No Comments