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Category — Education

Minnow the Fishing Cat and her Trainer, Linda, Help Protect Fishing Cats in the Wild

Meet Minnow, the Cincinnati Zoo’s first and only fishing cat ambassador. Minnow helps spread awareness about fishing cats at the Zoo, and she has inspired her trainer, Linda Castenada, to support research and conservation of the endangered fishing cat in the wild.

Minnow and her trainer, Linda

Minnow and her trainer, Linda

The fishing cat is a medium-sized cat from the wetlands of Southeast Asia that feeds on rodents, birds, frogs, fish and other aquatic species. Good swimmers, fishing cats have been observed to dive into water after fish as well as to scoop them out with their paws.

Minnow the fishing cat (Photo: Mark Dumont)

Minnow the fishing cat (Photo: Mark Dumont)

During the Cat Ambassador Program’s summer show at the Zoo (called the Cheetah Encounter), Minnow shows off her expert hunting and fishing skills. As far as we know, she is the only current fishing cat ambassador working on stage in an AZA-accredited zoo. Fishing cats are shy and secretive by nature, which makes it challenging to get them comfortable in front of an audience. Linda, who has worked as the Coordinator and Lead Trainer with the Cat Ambassador Program since 2007, was up for the challenge. Since the age of four when she got her first pet cat, Suzi, Linda has always been a cat person.

Linda Castenada and her pet cat, Suzi

Linda Castenada and her pet cat, Suzi

 

With Minnow, it took a lot of patience and paying attention her natural behavior to condition her to display her hunting skills successfully in front of an audience. Following a very set routine is one of the keys to maintaining her comfort. And rewarding her with her favorite fishy treats!

Minnow dives (Photo: ChengLun Na)

Minnow dives (Photo: ChengLun Na)

Minnow catches her fish (Photo: Kathy Moore)

Minnow catches her fish (Photo: Kathy Moore)

After several years of working with Minnow, Linda decided she wanted to do more to support fishing cats in the wild where the conversion of natural wetlands for aquaculture and the persecution of fishing cats for raiding fish and shrimp farms threaten their survival. Linda recently took on a new role as the Education Advisor to the Fishing Cat Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums to conserve species through research, breeding, education and conservation. Her mission is to increase awareness and raise funds for fishing cat conservation. To this end, Linda established the Fishing Cat Fund as well as a Fishing Cat SSP page on Facebook.

Fishing Cat Fund logo

She also secured support from the Cincinnati Zoo’s 2014 Internal Conservation Grants Fund for the Fishing Cat Conservancy’s program to conserve the fishing cat and its mangrove habitat around the Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary in India. Through the use of questionnaires, camera-traps, and in-field tracking with local communities, the Fishing Cat Conservancy and the Eastern Ghats Wildlife Society documents fishing cats in the region and involves local people in conservation education and awareness programs about fishing cats and their habitat.

Setting up a camera trap outside Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary (www.fishingcat.org)

Setting up a camera trap outside Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary (www.fishingcat.org)

Fishing cat caught on camera outside Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary (www.fishingcat.org)

Fishing cat caught on camera outside Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary (www.fishingcat.org)

This summer, I encourage you to catch Minnow in action during a Cheetah Encounter show and learn more about wild cats and their conservation around the globe.

Minnow post-swim (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Minnow post-swim (Photo: Kathy Newton)

February 18, 2015   3 Comments

Great Gardens at the Zoo

Guest blogger: Zoo Academy Student, Elaina Allen

Here at the Cincinnati Zoo we have a lot of fascinating animals to look at from leaf-cutting ants to Asian elephants. However there is more to the Cincinnati Zoo; the Zoo is also known for its amazing plant displays. One plant display in particular that I will be discussing is the amazing Dinosaur Garden located outside of the front entrance of Reptile House on the right side near Monkey Island.

The Dinosaur Garden was designed in the 1970s through 1980s around the time the Zoo also became a botanical garden. A botanical garden is an establishment where plants are grown for display to the public and often for educational study. The purpose of the Dinosaur Garden in particular is to convey knowledge to the visitor about the prehistoric plants that lived around the same time as the dinosaurs.

Dinosaur Garden (Photo: Elaina Allen)

Dinosaur Garden (Photo: Elaina Allen)

One thing interesting you can find inside the garden is the Araucarioxylon arizonicum or the petrified log. When a plant is fossilized it is considered petrified. The Araucarioxylon arizonicum is an extinct species of conifer that is known for its massive tree trunks.

Petrified log, Araucarioxylon arizonicum  (Photo: Elaina Allen)

Petrified log, Araucarioxylon arizonicum (Photo: Elaina Allen)

My favorite species to look at while in the area is the China Fir because this tree has pointy needles, which is an adaptation to defend itself against large animals such as dinosaurs.

China fir (Photo: Lazaregagnidze)

China fir (Photo: Lazaregagnidze)

Observing the Dinosaur Garden you will notice that some of the plants come and go, depending on the season. The Horticulture staff makes sure to maintain and keep up with the changes in the weather, and also the requirements or needs of the plants in the garden. Horticulture is the art of garden cultivation and management. The staff in the Horticulture department maintains any appropriate plant species throughout the Zoo.

So next time you decide to visit the Zoo, check out the Dinosaur Garden and the many other plant displays. You won’t regret it!

January 23, 2015   21 Comments

Zoo Academy is Life-changing

Guest blogger: Zoo Academy senior, Dominick Stowers

Hello, my name is Dominick and I am one of the most nonchalant seniors of this year. The reason I came to the Zoo Academy is it sounded like a really amazing experience that will take you far towards being the most renowned zoo keeper or director of a zoo. I came to better my education and I also have always had a real passion for animals of all sorts.

Although I have a passion for animals, I was not always allowed to explore that passion. There was always someone in my family that had a phobia of some kind of animal. My dad had a phobia of snakes and birds of all kinds. My mom and my two sisters and my little brother all have a phobia of insects and of any animal that they knew nothing about. For me, I am open to learning and handling any animal from insects to mammals to reptiles and birds. I just enjoy being around animals and the Zoo Academy gives me that chance to explore my passion.

Here I am handling a ball python

Here I am handling a ball python

The Zoo Academy is not just a high school or a place for work and no fun; that would be short selling the Zoo Academy. This program will allow a person to get their high school diploma and give them the chance to obtain experience in the field of animal care, nutrition and health. The students of this program are able to care for exotic animals that normally they could only see in television or in a movie and here at the Zoo Academy the students provide their services to help the zookeepers take great care of the animals from bathing to feeding. There is no other Zoo in the country that has a full time high school located on their premises, which makes the Cincinnati Zoo so fantastic and it is just an awesome opportunity to learn about rare and endangered animals.

Having the opportunity to work with these animals and these people is life changing. Once you have this experience, you will never look at life the same. The way that I use to view life and how I view life now is totally different. I did not know that life could be so peaceful inside a zoo with all those smells and noises. The zoo is so much more than just 70 acres of noisy and smelly animals; it is a place of peace and harmony which will change a person’s life if given the chance.

December 12, 2014   2 Comments