Random header image... Refresh for more!

Category — Education

Exploring a World of Learning at the Zoo Academy

Guest Blogger: Zoo Academy Junior, Kadriesha Glover

Hi, my name is Kadriesha Glover! I’m a junior at The Zoo Academy and I’m so happy that I get the opportunity to be here and learn and work with so many amazing people in this friendly, peaceful environment. Last year I went to a non-Cincinnati public school that I had planned on graduating from, but it closed. That summer, my dad decided to sign me up for Hughes High School where I was placed in the Zoo Academy program. I’m so happy that I was put in the Zoo Academy program because, so far, it has been the best experience! At the Zoo Academy I get to explore a world of learning that’s different and exciting and actually makes me want to get out of bed for school.

I know you’re probably wondering if students at the Zoo Academy have “normal” classes too. Yes, we do. We have “A” day and “B” day classes. This means, in the morning on an “A” day, we have a zoo and aquarium class, reading, and a plant and horticulture class. On the morning of a “B” day, we have College and Career, history and math. In the afternoons on both “A” and “B” days, we have lunch and then go out into our labs (I think this is the best part of the day!). In our labs, we get to choose a department in the Zoo to help out. It’s like a class that is more hands-on and also like a work experience. I’ve gotten to work with the Horticulture, Children’s Zoo, and Commissary departments and now I get to work with the Education Department (where I get to learn new things like how to write a blog post and create activities for children who come to Zoo classes). The staff members will give us evaluations at the end of our lab to say how well we did in that lab and then we get graded for the work we do.

My favorite part of the Zoo Academy labs is that I get the opportunity to not just look at the animals and the plant life here at the Zoo but to learn things about them as well as help care for them. I used to be scared of most animals, but participation in labs means meeting and holding some animals that I never thought that I would touch or even want to be near! To have a school that helps me overcome these fears is amazing.
Kadriesha turtle pic

Another reason that I love being at the Zoo Academy is the Zoo’s botanical garden. I love flowers and plants. Before I even came to the Zoo for the Zoo Academy, I always admired their tulips in the spring. They were so beautiful and I always wondered how the Zoo planted so many and why they grow only in the spring. Then, my first lab was with Horticulture and I got to plant those same tulips. I can’t wait until they blossom in the spring! In the horticulture classes I have on “A” days, I get to learn about all of these great plants, how they make their own food, how they survive during harsh times, how long they live, and answers to other questions like that. Not only do I get the answers to those questions in class, but I get to also work hands-on with the plants and see and those processes first hand. All of this information amazes me and makes me want to learn more and more.
zooblooms_header

Although when I graduate I plan on going to college to major in interior design, the Zoo Academy still teaches me the 21 century skills that I need such as time management, people skills, etc. These are very helpful no matter what job your planning on going into. The Zoo Academy isn’t just one of those schools that only focus on one thing. These labs help us explore the various careers that are out in the world. Every department has a different role that they play in making sure that the Zoo is put together, the animals are taking care of, the public is educated and people are having fun when they come.

I think that no matter who you are or what you want to become when you graduate high school the Zoo Academy can give you the skills you need to do the job of your choosing. What I’ll take from the Zoo Academy when I graduate is not just knowledge of all animals and all plants, but also the knowledge I need to be successful in life. So if you’re looking for a school that gives you knowledge AND experience, then the Zoo Academy is a great place to come.

March 24, 2016   1 Comment

Five Ways the Zoo Can Help You Practice Mindfulness

Guest blogger: Education Intern, Kristina Meek

It seems that nearly every day another study informs us of the benefits of mindfulness–for children as well as adults. Educators use mindfulness techniques in classrooms. A wide range of authors, from the scientific to the self-help ends of the spectrum, have published books on how to be more mindful.

A meeting of the minds (Photo: Kathy Newton)

A meeting of the minds (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Put simply, mindfulness is the practice of being aware of your thoughts. Mindfulness techniques can be as immediate as a deep breath or as long-term as a commitment to daily meditation. Practicing mindfulness has been shown to lower stress, ease pain, increase empathy, and improve concentration.

What does that have to do with visiting the Zoo? Animals are excellent tutors of mindfulness. They don’t constantly check their cell phones, worry about what others think of them, regret the past or fear the future. They live in the now. The Zoo offers myriad ways to practice mindfulness. Here are five:

  1. Watch the red pandas play. Or the river otters. Or the apes. Choose your favorite, but take several uninterrupted minutes to fully observe animals at play. They don’t worry about whether they look silly or how many calories they’re burning. They play with abandon. Science doesn’t understand completely why animals play, but it clearly benefits them. Whether you’re an adult or a child, you can learn about living in the moment from the animals.

    Visitors watch the river otters play. (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

    Visitors watch the river otters play. (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

  2. Engage your senses. A visit to the Zoo naturally coaxes you to use sight, smell, touch, hearing…and even taste, if you stop for a bite. Invite your children to describe what they see, hear, and smell. Encourage them to pet pygmy goats in the Spaulding Children’s Zoo. Sometimes it’s enough just to remember what the world looks like in three dimensions, rather than on a screen!
  3. Watch the manatees swim. Manatee Springs provides a comfy place to sit, close to the glass, with a view straight into the manatee tank. If you visit on a chilly day, mid-week, you’ll have the best chance at smaller crowds and a more relaxing experience. These hulking marine mammals twist and tumble gracefully through the water, inviting you to exhale and admire.

    Mesmerizing manatees (Photo: Kathy Newton)

    Mesmerizing manatees (Photo: Kathy Newton)

  4. Try not photographing everything. Of course, you’ll want a few photos to remember your visit. But, if you’re a member and stop by regularly, designate a “no photography” trip. Or limit yourself to taking photos of only certain activities. You’ll be more focused on what’s happening instead of capturing it for later. Plus, if your camera is your phone, leaving it holstered will minimize the temptation to check Facebook, e-mail, or other incoming distractions. Whether you’re with your kids, other family, or good friends, you’ll enjoy more quality time together.
  5. Visit the Garden of Peace. Sit a moment and relax in this lesser-trafficked corner of the Zoo, just off the path near Jungle Trails. Take in the multi-cultural messages of peace and bask, for a moment, in gratitude–one of the key elements of mindfulness.

So, wherever you are right now… take a deep breath, and start planning your next visit to the Zoo. And, when life gets too hectic to make the trip, we’re always a click away with photos and videos that offer you a mini break from everyday stress.

March 23, 2016   No Comments

Six Ways the Zoo Can Stimulate Your Kids’ Interest in Math

Guest blogger: Education Intern, Kristina Meek

numbersLike any subject, math has its fans and its detractors. If your child is one of the latter, you might struggle to find ways to make math interesting. Since kids get excited about animals in general, and the Zoo, in particular, a trip to the Cincinnati Zoo could help. Here are a few tips to get you started. With a little creative thinking, you can probably come up with a few ideas of your own!

  1. Start with counting. Visit an exhibit and ask your child, how many lemurs do you see? How many fennec foxes? How many baby animals and how many adults? Can you add the two numbers together?

    How many lemurs can you count?

    How many lemurs can you count?

  2. Make up sneaky word problems. Throughout the Zoo, and on our website, you’ll find fun facts about animals. When you encounter numbers, use them as a spark for a simple word problem. For example: An Asian elephant can consume around 100 pounds of food per day. How much food do the Cincinnati Zoo’s four elephants, together, consume in a day? A month? A year?
  3. Spot shapes. Animal bodies display a variety of shapes, which are the foundation for geometry. Some cats’ ears are triangles while others are circles. One animal may have a rectangular body, another an oval one. Ask your child to point out what shapes he or she notices.
  4. Check out the leaf-cutting ants. At the Zoo’s interactive leaf-cutting ant exhibit, inside World of the Insect, you can watch real ants haul leaves back to their nest — right over your head! Your child can stand at the colorful console to time the ants’ progress, count them, and make predictions about their behavior. They won’t even notice they’re using math.

    Leaf-cutting ant (Photo: David Jenike)

    Leaf-cutting ant (Photo: David Jenike)

  5. Manage money. When you visit the Zoo, you might stop for lunch at one of our restaurants or choose a souvenir from the Zoo Shop. If you’re using cash, and your child is the appropriate age, ask him or her to pay at the register. Regardless of your payment method, kids can help do calculations like how much you’ll save with an item that’s on sale or by using a coupon.
  6. Make connections. Visiting the Zoo might inspire your child to pursue a career in a field like botany, biology, or environmental science. Let him or her know that studying math can open possibilities along that path. Math is the “language” used in science, so it’s critical to study subjects like algebra, calculus, and statistics.

The benefits of bringing your children to the Zoo sure are adding up. Enjoy!

 

March 16, 2016   3 Comments