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Category — Education

A Glimpse into our Green Teens!

By Kaitlin Burt, Sustainability Intern

At the “Greenest Zoo in America”, we are constantly working to make the zoo and the visitors experience as green as possible. An important aspect of doing this is getting the word out and educating our visitors. This summer we are lucky to have a great group of teens that are doing just that. These teens are known as the Green Teens and this is the Zoo’s third summer having them volunteer with us. The Green Teens rotate their time between multiple stations such as the Go Green Garden, the Aquaponics Greenhouse, the Base Camp Café, and teaching about Vermicomposting at Insect World. With the help of these Green Teens, we are able to educate and answer any questions the visitors might have on what the Zoo is doing to go green, as well as help make our guests have a positive visitor experience to the Zoo.

Many of our teens have volunteered with us for multiple summers, and we are so grateful to have them! Below is an interview done with three of our current Green Teens, all returning Green Teens and are very knowledgeable about the Zoo’s green efforts. Candice is a junior at Oak Hills High School, Christine is a sophomore at Ursula High School, and Hailey is a freshman at Campbell County High School.

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Candice, Christine, and Hailey

Interview:

1.    What is your favorite green initiative the Zoo has implemented?
a.    Candice: Aquaponics
b.    Christine: Solar Canopy
c.    Hailey: Solar Canopy

2.    What is the most interesting thing you have learned about while being a Green Teen?
a.    Candice: That 80% of waste can be diverted from landfills by composting and recycling
b.    Christine: That food utensils can be made to be compostable
c.    Hailey: Learning about the Aquaponics system and how you can make your own no waste habitat

3.    What is your favorite Green Teen station (The Aquaponics Greenhouse, The Go Green Garden, or Vermicomposting at Insect World) to volunteer with?
a.    Candice: Go Green Garden
b.    Christine: Go Green Garden
c.    Hailey: Vermicomposting at Insect World

4.    Why did you come back to be a Green Teen this year?
a.    Candice: Because I had so much fun last year
b.    Christine: I enjoy volunteering at the zoo and being around other green teens
c.    Hailey: Because I always have a lot of fun here and I like being near animals

5.    What is your favorite memory/story from working at the Zoo this summer?
a.    Candice: While transporting the worm bin back and forth between Insect World, giving brief synopsis on vermicomposting to everyone who is interested, and reaching people who might not normally be interested in composting.
b.    Christine: Helping a family learn how to start vermicomposting at their own house
c.    Hailey: At Insect World, getting little kids excited about the worms and interested in composting

6.    What is your favorite exhibit or animal at the zoo?
a.    Candice: Manatees and CREW
b.    Christine: Manatee Springs
c.    Hailey: Wolves and Painted Dogs

7.    What is one skill you will take away from this experience?
a.    Candice: Public Speaking
b.    Christine: Keeping calm with large groups of people
c.    Hailey: Public Speaking, and learning to shorten my stories

8.    What are your future Career Plans? What do you hope to study in college?
a.    Candice: Wants to major in biology and maybe work with CREW one day
b.    Christine: Wants to major in biology in college so she can be a zoologist for National Geographic
c.    Hailey: Wants to be an exhibit interpreter or run her own animal training business

9.    If you could have everyone perform one conservation action, what would it be?

a.    Candice: Stop mining all together
b.    Christine: For everyone to recycle
c.    Hailey: For everyone to compost and recycle and reduce what goes to the landfill

10.    What advice would you give future Green Teens?
a.    Candice: Read the info packet, practice speaking, and have fun!
b.    Christine: Keep up to date on what’s going on at the zoo
c.    Hailey: Get to know your audience

These young ladies, along with 17 other teens, have increased their public speaking skills, customer service skills, and knowledge about sustainability. With these young men and women, the Zoo is able to continue to share its story about being the “Greenest Zoo in America.”

The Zoo’s VolunTeen program is open to teens ages 13-17 with opportunities such as the Green Teens as well as opportunities in Horticulture, Education, and with T.R.I.B.E. For more information, visit http://cincinnatizoo.org/support/volunteer/ and click on the VolunTeens Tab.

August 6, 2014   No Comments

A Roaring Success!

International Tiger Day was a roaring success! Thousands of guests came out to the Zoo on Tuesday, July 29, and those who visited Cat Canyon joined us in honoring our Malayan tiger brothers, Taj and Who-Dey, and their counterparts in the wild.

From 10:00 to 3:00, Zoo staff and volunteers were on hand to talk to guests about tigers and conservation. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

From 10:00 to 3:00, Zoo staff and volunteers were on hand to talk to guests about tigers and conservation. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Guests could compare a cast of a tiger's paw to their own hand. (Photo: Shasta Bray)

Guests could compare a cast of a tiger’s paw to their own hand and check out a cardboard “deer” that will soon become a toy for the tigers. (Photo: Shasta Bray)

Here I am showing a young guests one of the tigers' favorite enrichment toys - a huge hard plastic ball. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Here I am showing a young guest one of the tigers’ favorite enrichment toys – a huge hard plastic ball. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We painted tiger whiskers on hundreds of guests... (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We painted tiger whiskers on hundreds of guests… (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

and asked them to give us their best tiger roar! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

and asked them to give us their best tiger roar! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Even Taj and Who-Dey showed off their stripes. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Even Taj and Who-Dey showed up to show off their stripes. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Check out more fantastic Tiger Day photos on our Flickr site! Our own Pat Story created a fun video of the event. And Channel 9 featured it on their news as well.

Thanks for coming out and making our first International Tiger Day event a blast and be sure to add July 29 to your calendar for next year!

 

August 1, 2014   No Comments

Saving Red Pandas

Co-written by Shasta Bray and Crissi Lanier

What is this frosty-faced beauty of ringed tail and rust-colored fur? A raccoon? A bear? Actually, the red panda is neither of these and is indeed a PANDA!  It is its own species unrelated to the others. This beautiful auburn-colored mammal is native to Central Asia and is designed for a life in the trees. Pandas are expert climbers with sharp claws and hair on the bottom of their feet that keeps them from slipping. They are great jumpers, too, able to jump up to five feet in one leap.

Check out the claws on one of our male pandas, Rover.

Check out the claws on one of our male pandas, Rover. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Currently, the Zoo is home to six red pandas – three males named Homer, Rover and Toby and three females named LiWu, Bailey and Lin.  Lin, daughter of Bailey and Toby, is the youngest and recently celebrated her first birthday on June 16th, which she shares with Rover who turned nine years old.

Lin has small white tufts sticking out of the bottoms of her ears, making her easy to identify among our pandas. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Lin has small white tufts sticking out of the bottoms of her ears, making her easy to identify among our pandas. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We breed our pandas in accordance with the Red Panda Species Survival Plan (SSP) managed by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The SSP keeps a studbook of all the red pandas in North American zoos, determines which animals should be mated, and develops long-term research and management strategies for the species. Our very own Zoo Registrar, Mary Noell, is the Program Leader for the studbook.

Baby Lin soon after she was born

Baby Lin soon after she was born

The red panda exhibit is just beyond the Children’s Zoo entrance in the center of the Zoo. Two yards sit side-by-side so make sure to look on both sides, especially high up in the trees where they spend much of their time hanging out. Red pandas tend to be more active at dawn and dusk, and at the Zoo, during the 2:15pm Red Panda Animal Encounter when they get yummy treats like apples and other fruits. In the wild, they eat mostly young tender bamboo shoots and leaves, as well as some grasses, roots and fruits.

Lin receives treats from her keeper, Lissa, during an Animal Encounter (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Lin receives treats from her keeper, Lissa, during an Animal Encounter (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Want to meet our pandas up close and personal? Sign up for an Endangered Excursion where you’ll get to watch our talented red pandas create a one-of-a-kind canvas painting for you to take home and enjoy. That’s right, our pandas are painters! And you can purchase these unique masterpieces in the Zoo gift shop as well. Here’s a sneak peek of LiWu painting.

Red pandas are classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which means they face a high risk of extinction in the wild. Proceeds from the Endangered Excursions and the sales of red panda paintings support the Red Panda Network’s efforts to protect red pandas and their bamboo forests in the wild through the education and empowerment of local communities. The Red Panda Network’s immediate goal is the creation of Panchthar-Ilam-Taplejung Red Panda Protected Forest, located in Eastern Nepal, which will be the world’s first protected area dedicated to red panda.Red Panda Network

Next time you’re at the Zoo, be sure to stop by and visit our fuzzy faces!

See you soon, says Rover! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

See you soon, says Rover! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

July 31, 2014   1 Comment