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Category — Exhibits

Eight Ways a Trip to the Zoo Can Stimulate Your Child’s Interest in Art

Co-written with Kristina Meek, Wild Encounters Interpreter

Sometimes we think of art and science as living at opposite ends of a spectrum. Maybe you imagine that your zoology-loving child will say, “Art is sooo boooring,” when actually, art has the power to enrich lives at any age. According to PBS, for example, exposing kids to art can positively impact their motor skills, decision making, language skills, and more. Here’s how your Zoo visit can bring art to life for your child.

  1. Notice color, and help your child do the same. A great place to start is in the Wings of the World bird house where you’ll find an array of different birds in brilliant colors. Point out how colorful plumage, such as the iconic tail feathers of a peacock, can help male birds attract mates. Ask your child to point out what colors she sees and which ones she likes best. Bring crayons and paper along so that your kids can capture what they see.

    Colorful peacock! (Photo: Deb Simon)

    Colorful peacock! (Photo: Deb Simon)

  2. Study the murals in the animal exhibits in Night Hunters. They were painted by artist John Agnew, who has also painted murals for Cincinnati Museum Center, Miami Whitewater Forest, and for zoos as far away as Moscow, Russia. As a youth, he became interested in dinosaurs and reptiles, and took part in the Dayton Museum of Natural History’s Junior Curator program. His penchant for animals and talent for a realistic style of painting combined into a successful career. Agnew helped found Masterworks for Nature, a group of 15 prominent Cincinnati area artists, who raise money for conservation through the sale of their artwork.

    Bobcat exhibit (Photo: Mike Dulaney)

    Bobcat exhibit (Photo: Mike Dulaney)

  3. Admire a reproduction of a 2013 painting by renowned wildlife artist John Ruthven entitled Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon. The painting depicts Martha, the last known passenger pigeon, leading a flock. Martha lived at the Cincinnati Zoo, and when she passed away in 1914, the passenger pigeon went extinct. This painting was reproduced by Artworks on the side of a building in Downtown Cincinnati to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Martha’s passing in 2014.

    John Ruthven with his painting, Martha - the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

    John Ruthven with his painting, Martha – the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

  4. Go on a scavenger hunt to find the many animal sculptures displayed throughout the Zoo. Ask your child to imagine how they were made. What can they learn about the animal’s features from studying them? Here is a short list:
    • Hippos and lions in the Africa exhibit
    • Gorillas outside Gorilla World
    • Manatees and crocodiles outside Manatee Springs
    • Galapagos tortoise near the Reptile House
    • Tiger in Cat Canyon
    • Passenger pigeon at the Passenger Pigeon Memorial

      Hippo sculpture (Photo: Shasta Bray)

      Hippo sculpture (Photo: Shasta Bray)

  5. Check out the recycled materials art in the Go Green Garden. Every year or two, the Zoo works with a school or community group to create a new piece of art for display in this space. The current piece was created by the 2014-2015 Colerain High School Ceramics/3D class. Ask your child to notice what types of recycled materials were used. What other materials could they imagine using to create their own recycled art?

    Recycled art created by Colerain High School students (Photo: Shasta Bray)

    Recycled art created by Colerain High School students (Photo: Shasta Bray)

  6. Turn your own Zoo photos into art. While you’re visiting, take lots of photos. (Why wouldn’t you?) Play with photo filters or experiment with Photoshop or a similar program at home. If your child is more tactically inclined, print the photos and together you might add borders or other embellishments. They’ll end up with a cherished memento of their visit.
  7. Visit our animal artists. Some of the animals who live at the Zoo, including elephants and rhinos, moonlight as artists. Observe each of these animals closely and see if you can figure out how they’re able to paint. Want to display a one-of-a-kind masterpiece created by one of our animal artists in your own home? Purchase one online or book a behind-the-scenes experience that involves watching a penguin, goat or elephant paint a canvas just for you.

    VIPenguin Tour

    VIPenguin Tour

  8. Get a “handimal” painted especially for your child. Visit the booth near Vine Street Village where the artists will turn your child’s handprint into a colorful and creative animal image. You’ll leave with a unique keepsake and your child will witness an artist at work.

    Handimals! (Photo: Shasta Bray)

    Handimals! (Photo: Shasta Bray)

August 3, 2016   5 Comments

Come Meet the New Malayan Tigers on International Tiger Day

Our new Malayan tigers, Jalil (male) and Cinta (female), have made their public debut in Cat Canyon just in time for our International Tiger Day celebration. This Friday, July 29, Cat Canyon keepers and Zoo volunteers will be on hand at the Malayan tiger exhibit to share the latest news on our tigers and the need for tiger conservation. Throughout the day, there will be special presentations and activities for guests and tigers alike.

Jalil scopes out his new digs. (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Jalil scopes out his new digs. (Photo: Kathy Newton)

While we celebrate and increase awareness for tiger conservation here at the Zoo, we also continue to support tiger conservation in the wild through Panthera’s Tigers Forever program. In Malaysia, Panthera works with international partners to train local rangers to patrol forests, gather intelligence and arrest poachers in Taman Negara National Park and Endau-Rompin National Park.Panthera logo

Panthera employs cutting-edge technology in the fight against poaching. PoacherCams are motion-activated cameras that send real-time photos of people engaged in illegal activities to law enforcement. Thanks to these efforts, recent population monitoring data indicates that the tiger population is stable in Taman Negara and increasing in Endau-Rompin. Great news for Malayan tigers!

Cat Canyon keeper, Mike Land, talks to visitors about tigers (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Cat Canyon keeper, Mike Land, talks to visitors about tigers (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

So come on out to the Zoo on Friday and celebrate with us! New this year, our vendor will offer discounts on tiger face painting to support the event so you can take your tiger fandom to the next level.

Tiger fans! (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

Tiger fans! (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

July 27, 2016   No Comments

Hippo Keeper’s Blog: Hippos Bibi & Henry Get Nose to Nose Behind the Scenes

By now you’ve surely heard the exciting news! The Cincinnati Zoo’s two newest residents are settling into their brand new home, Hippo Cove. When the exhibit opens later this month, you will all have an opportunity to meet and fall in love with both of them, but until then, here is some behind-the-scenes info to tide you over!

Bibi enjoying the pool.

Bibi enjoying the pool.

 It has been 20 years since the Cincinnati Zoo’s collection has included hippopotamuses, so we knew we’d need to brush up on hippo husbandry before the arrival of our pair. Two Africa department keepers, Jenna Wingate and myself, were fortunate enough to travel to the St. Louis Zoo to meet Bibi, a 17-year-old female hippo, and the keepers that have taken care of her for years. The St. Louis team allowed us to shadow them during a typical day so that we could learn all about Bibi and the ins and outs of her care. My first impression of Bibi was how very laid back she seemed. In her St. Louis bloat, Bibi was the largest hippo and therefore the dominant female by default, but I wouldn’t have guessed it based on her calm demeanor. We left with a wealth of knowledge and a mounting level of excitement about bringing hippos to Cincinnati!

bibi-131 A couple of weeks later, it was time for Bibi’s journey to Cincinnati. Shipping hippos can be a tricky business involving extra-large travel crates, flat-bed trailers, trucks, cranes and lots of communication and teamwork. Fortunately, Bibi’s shipment went very smoothly. Though she seemed a little nervous at first (sitting in her travel crate and refusing to come out), she quickly settled into her new home and grew comfortable with her new keepers. Exactly one week later, it was Henry’s turn to make the big move! Henry will be turning 35 years old this August and comes to Cincinnati from the Dickerson Park Zoo. As with Bibi’s shipment, everything went smoothly with Henry, and two of his keepers from Dickerson Park Zoo even spent the rest of that day and the following day with us in Cincinnati to share all of their knowledge with our team. Henry seemed even less phased by the change of location and happily went about his hippo business as soon as he figured out how to navigate the stairs into his indoor pool. We now had 2 new hippos, a brand new exhibit and holding facilities, and all of the inside info on hippo husbandry and care. We were ready and excited to start taking care of these amazing animals.

Henry in the pool.

Henry in the pool.

 Hippos have always been my favorite animal, ever since I was a kid. Getting to work with them now is a dream come true! They are larger than life, weighing in at ~4,000lbs (Henry) and ~3,000lbs (Bibi), and their personalities are even bigger! Bibi is smart and interactive and will approach keepers several times throughout the day with her mouth agape, begging for food or asking us to spray her with the hose. Henry’s personality has been tougher to assess, as he seems completely “twitterpated” by his soon-to-be mate, Bibi. From the moment he laid eyes on her, Henry has been intent on trying to find a path to Bibi. Henry, a proven breeder, has already sired offspring in the past, but he has been without a mate for 20 years! Clearly he cannot wait to spend some quality time with Miss Bibi.    

  Both hippos seem very excited about their outdoor exhibit as well. With a 70,000 gallon pool, a waterfall and a beautiful sandy beach, who wouldn’t be?! During her first time in the water, Bibi dazzled zoo employees with her aquatic acrobatics, spinning and swirling and even doing some somersaults in the deep end!

Bibi spinning and swirling in the water.

Bibi spinning and swirling in the water.

  When it was Henry’s turn to try out the exhibit, it didn’t take long for him to give his seal of approval, which he expressed by dung showering the waterfall. If you are unfamiliar with the term, dung showering is when a hippo defecates and flaps their tail at the same time to spread the dung around and mark their territory. It is shocking, impressive, horrifying and hilarious all at once. But it was a welcomed sign to keepers that Henry was making himself at home.

Dung shower!

Dung shower!

  Since the two hippos are brand new to Cincinnati and each other, the animal care staff has decided to take the introductions slowly, allowing each hippo to become familiar with the holding spaces and the exhibit before they are put together. Overnight, the hippos are given “howdy” access to each other via the indoor pool. On several occasions, keepers have observed Henry and Bibi vocalizing to each other and touching noses through the shift door. The hippos even nap right up against the shift door with their bodies lined up and touching through the gaps. Fortunately, all indications suggest that the two are both compatible and eager to be with each other, a good sign since we have a breeding recommendation for the pair! 

  Official introductions will be happening in the coming weeks, and then keepers will begin putting Henry and Bibi on exhibit together so that they are comfortable in their new space before their grand debut to the public on July 21st. The Cincinnati Zoo family cannot wait for you all to meet handsome Henry and beautiful Bibi this summer! We’ll see you soon in Hippo Cove!

July 6, 2016   16 Comments