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Category — Keeper’s Komments

Meet Insectarium Keeper Mandy Pritchard

Contributors: April Pitman, Wendy Rice, and Jenna Wingate

Mandy Pritchard works as a keeper at World of the Insect, also called the Insectarium. Mandy has a solid entomology background and she is very knowledgeable of the biology and taxonomy of a variety of different species of insects. As a keeper, Mandy is in charge of maintaining and breeding 15 species. Most of her species require fresh plant cuttings, so you will see her out in the park every day (rain, shine or snow) looking for the best plants for her cultures.

According to her colleagues, Mandy is an awesome coworker. She helps train volunteers and new hires, and whenever her coworkers go to her with questions, she is always open and willing to help. Mandy is very easy to get along with and is one of the reasons the Insectarium is such a team-oriented and cohesive department.

Mandy Pritchard introducing American Burying Beetles

Mandy Pritchard introducing American Burying Beetles

Additionally, Mandy is an awesome representation of the zookeeping profession because of her passion for conservation. She goes above and beyond her job as a keeper. Currently, she is in charge of the American Burying Beetle reintroduction program at the Zoo. She successfully collaborates with other agencies outside the Zoo (Ohio Fish and Wildlife, Fernald Preserve, and more) to work towards a lasting conservation solution. The program itself is requires much diligence and hard work. Mandy is in charge of organizing dates for the release, helping to staff the release, raising the beetles, setting traps to survey the area before and after the release, and much more.

One of the most important things keepers do is educate the public on conservation and Mandy does a great job of that. Sharing her passion with the public comes naturally to Mandy. She just recently gave a talk at the Fernald Preserve (where the beetles are released) to help educate the public on the importance of this species. It is not the easiest thing to show people why this beetle should be saved. Most people just see it as another bug! But Mandy does a great job of enlightening everyone, keeping the audience interested and even getting a few laughs, too! Mandy has the ability to make people care about something they never thought they would. Keep it up, Mandy!

 

July 24, 2014   No Comments

Meet Tom Tenhunfeld

Contributors: Linda Castaneda, & Wendy Rice

Tom Tenhundfeld works as a keeper at the Cincinnati Zoo’s off-site breeding facility, Mast Farm. Tom lives and works at the Mast Farm where he is responsible for the daily maintenance and upkeep of the huge 107-acre property as well as the care and husbandry of breeding populations of cranes and cheetahs, among other species.

Tom Tenhundfeld and Cathryn Hilker

Tom Tenhundfeld and Cathryn Hilker

Speaking of cheetahs, Tom is the leader of one of the most consistently successful cheetah breeding programs in the country. Since 2002, 41 cheetah cubs have been produced at the facility under Tom’s guidance. He is patient, but tenacious with his collection, and his attention to detail and knowledge of cheetah language is a skill that is unique and that no doubt contributes to his success.

Tom used to be an on-grounds hoofed stock and carnivore keeper. His animal sense and years of experience make him invaluable in his current role. He always puts his animals first and isn’t afraid to speak on behalf of their well-being. We are proud to have Tom on our team!

July 23, 2014   1 Comment

Meet Primate Keeper Eric High

Contributor: Ron Evans

Continuing our celebration of National Zoo Keeper Week, we’d like you to meet Eric High, Head Keeper in the Zoo’s Primate Department. Eric has worked at the Zoo for almost 15 years, and he has an incredible work ethic. He sets a “high” bar (pun intended) for his keepers, and leads by strong example.

Zoo Keeper Eric High with baby gorilla Gladys.

Zoo Keeper Eric High with baby gorilla Gladys.

Eric is acutely focused on the myriad of Zoo and departmental missions and goals that have been presented to him, and is instrumental in their development, execution and long term management. Eric was key in facilitating some of the first examples of many programs we practice zoo-wide and are common today. For example, Eric helped usher one of our very first animal department comprehensive operant conditioning programs with gorillas in the early 2000s. It still stands as one of the best in the Zoo.

Additionally, he helped develop and manage one of the very first advertised keeper chats (outside of the Cat, Bird and Elephant shows) at the Zoo, complete with microphones, which at the time scared half the keepers to death to use. He knew it was important to the Zoo’s mission and that it would help set the bar for other departments.

Finally, Eric managed the complicated scheduling of staff working 24/7 during the very challenging Gladys surrogacy project and kept the rest of the Primate Center needs on track while many resources had to be diverted for Gladys.

Eric is one of the rock solid foundation keepers that allow us to maintain current programs while supporting efforts to enhance and grow new ones. If we could clone a bunch of him, we could run this Zoo with about half the staff. The productivity would go way, way up!

July 22, 2014   No Comments