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Passenger Pigeon Commemoration Gaining Momentum

We’ve been busy! Here’s an update on various projects and events we’ve been working on surrounding the commemoration of the centennial of the passenger pigeon’s extinction on September 1:

Passenger Pigeon Memorial Renovation

The Passenger Pigeon Memorial itself is of historic importance.  Built for the September 18, 1875 opening of the Zoo, it is the last remaining in a series of seven rectangular pagoda-type, tile-roofed buildings connected by wire summer cages in a complex 320 feet long, known as the Aviary or “Old Bird Run.”  The center building, larger than the others, was more elaborate, with pediments on each facade, and a short square tower capped with a pseudo-onion dome.  The six smaller units of the Aviary were demolished in 1974-75.  The large central pavilion, which was the actual final home of Martha, was retained, moved about 50 feet northwest of its original location, and restored as the Passenger Pigeon Memorial, opening in 1977.  Collectively with the Zoo’s Reptile House – the nation’s oldest Zoo building – and the Elephant House, built in 1906, the Passenger Pigeon Memorial constitutes the Zoo’s designation as a National Historic Landmark.

Postcard showign the original bird aviaries

Postcard showing the original bird aviaries

A reproduction of John Ruthven’s recently completed painting of Martha – the Last Passenger Pigeon, will draw visitors’ attention from the main Zoo path. 

John Ruthven's painting of Martha, the last passenger pigeon, will welcome visitors into the new space.

John Ruthven’s painting of Martha, the last passenger pigeon, will welcome visitors into the new space.

Inside the building, updated lighting and ceiling treatment will brighten up the space.  All new interpretive signage will comprise flat wall panels featuring rich visual images and appropriate narrative.

Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Inside the Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

Inside the Passenger Pigeon Memorial under renovation

New walls ready for signage installation

New walls ready for signage installation

Putting the finishing touches on the restored doors

Putting the finishing touches on the restored doors

Artifacts such as a net and stool pigeon and wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by our own Gary Denzler will be presented in the exhibit as well.

The new exhibit will feature wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by Gary Denzler.

The new exhibit will feature wood carvings of a pair of passenger pigeons by Gary Denzler.

The update will speak to the conservation of endangered species, using the story of the passenger pigeon as a lesson from the past for a sustainable future. First, it will explain the story of the passenger pigeon and its extinction, why it happened, and the scope of this loss. Next, the exhibit will describe how the passenger pigeon’s extinction was a wake-up call that spurred the conservation movement in America, highlighting the stories of native species that were nearly lost, such as white-tailed deer.  Then, the exhibit will present examples of species’ conservation efforts in which the Zoo is involved, including the Sumatran rhino and Autumn buttercup. Finally, the exhibition will invite visitors to get involved.

The interpretive installation has begun!

The interpretive installation has begun!

The dedication of the newly renovated exhibit will take place on September 1 beginning at 12:30.

Fold the Flock: Paper Pigeons

We are in the midst of a folding frenzy! Thousands of paper passenger pigeons are being folded by summer campers, visitors, staff and volunteers, which will be suspended from the ceiling of the Education Center at the Zoo later this month.

Hard at work folding pigeons

Hard at work folding pigeons

A pile of paper passenger pigeons!

A pile of paper passenger pigeons!

Paper passenger pigeons hanging in the Education Center lobby

Paper passenger pigeons hanging in the Education Center lobby

Add your pigeon to the flock! Download the foldable passenger pigeon template, print it off (double-sided, 11 X 17, full color is best) and fold it. Then send it or bring it to the Education Center at the Zoo to be hung with thousands of others before September 1.

Passenger Pigeon Memorial Weekend

Along with the Ohio Ornithological Society (OOS), the Zoo is hosting a Passenger Pigeon Weekend symposium at the Zoo on August 29 & 30. Friday night will be a “Martinis with Martha” fundraiser to benefit the Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) and the OOS Conservation Fund with food, drinks, live music and guest presentations. Saturday morning brings an assemblage of guest speakers with stories about lessons learned from the passenger pigeon, including Joel Greenberg (author of  A Feathered River Across the Sky), wildlife artist John Ruthven, Jim McCormac (author of Wild Ohio: The Best of our Natural Heritage) and Zoo Horticulturist Brian Jorg. And much, much more!

Registration is now open! Purchase your tickets here.

Barrows Conservation Lecture Series

On September 3, wildlife artist John Ruthven will speak as part of the Barrows Conservation Lecture Series at the Zoo. John Ruthven, naturalist, author, lecturer, and internationally acknowledged master of wildlife art, is often called the “20th Century Audubon.”

In 1974, John spearheaded the effort to save the last of the Zoo’s 19th Century bird pagoda’s – the one where “Martha,” the last of the passenger pigeons, had once lived. Through his leadership, and the sale of prints of his painting of “Martha,” the Zoo’s Passenger Pigeon Memorial was created.

John Ruthven with his painting, Martha - the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

John Ruthven with his painting, Martha – the Last Passenger Pigeon (Photo: Ron Ellis)

Today, John has taken it a giant step forward, with his painting, “Martha – The Last Passenger Pigeon.” This print will be available for sale before and after his lecture. The price is $200.00. All prints are signed and numbered. The size is 30 x 20 inches.

Purchase tickets to John Ruthven’s lecture here.

To read the other posts in this series, click here.

August 25, 2014   No Comments

A Roaring Success!

International Tiger Day was a roaring success! Thousands of guests came out to the Zoo on Tuesday, July 29, and those who visited Cat Canyon joined us in honoring our Malayan tiger brothers, Taj and Who-Dey, and their counterparts in the wild.

From 10:00 to 3:00, Zoo staff and volunteers were on hand to talk to guests about tigers and conservation. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

From 10:00 to 3:00, Zoo staff and volunteers were on hand to talk to guests about tigers and conservation. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Guests could compare a cast of a tiger's paw to their own hand. (Photo: Shasta Bray)

Guests could compare a cast of a tiger’s paw to their own hand and check out a cardboard “deer” that will soon become a toy for the tigers. (Photo: Shasta Bray)

Here I am showing a young guests one of the tigers' favorite enrichment toys - a huge hard plastic ball. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Here I am showing a young guest one of the tigers’ favorite enrichment toys – a huge hard plastic ball. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We painted tiger whiskers on hundreds of guests... (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We painted tiger whiskers on hundreds of guests… (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

and asked them to give us their best tiger roar! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

and asked them to give us their best tiger roar! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Even Taj and Who-Dey showed off their stripes. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Even Taj and Who-Dey showed up to show off their stripes. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Check out more fantastic Tiger Day photos on our Flickr site! Our own Pat Story created a fun video of the event. And Channel 9 featured it on their news as well.

Thanks for coming out and making our first International Tiger Day event a blast and be sure to add July 29 to your calendar for next year!

 

August 1, 2014   No Comments

Saving Red Pandas

Co-written by Shasta Bray and Crissi Lanier

What is this frosty-faced beauty of ringed tail and rust-colored fur? A raccoon? A bear? Actually, the red panda is neither of these and is indeed a PANDA!  It is its own species unrelated to the others. This beautiful auburn-colored mammal is native to Central Asia and is designed for a life in the trees. Pandas are expert climbers with sharp claws and hair on the bottom of their feet that keeps them from slipping. They are great jumpers, too, able to jump up to five feet in one leap.

Check out the claws on one of our male pandas, Rover.

Check out the claws on one of our male pandas, Rover. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Currently, the Zoo is home to six red pandas – three males named Homer, Rover and Toby and three females named LiWu, Bailey and Lin.  Lin, daughter of Bailey and Toby, is the youngest and recently celebrated her first birthday on June 16th, which she shares with Rover who turned nine years old.

Lin has small white tufts sticking out of the bottoms of her ears, making her easy to identify among our pandas. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Lin has small white tufts sticking out of the bottoms of her ears, making her easy to identify among our pandas. (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

We breed our pandas in accordance with the Red Panda Species Survival Plan (SSP) managed by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The SSP keeps a studbook of all the red pandas in North American zoos, determines which animals should be mated, and develops long-term research and management strategies for the species. Our very own Zoo Registrar, Mary Noell, is the Program Leader for the studbook.

Baby Lin soon after she was born

Baby Lin soon after she was born

The red panda exhibit is just beyond the Children’s Zoo entrance in the center of the Zoo. Two yards sit side-by-side so make sure to look on both sides, especially high up in the trees where they spend much of their time hanging out. Red pandas tend to be more active at dawn and dusk, and at the Zoo, during the 2:15pm Red Panda Animal Encounter when they get yummy treats like apples and other fruits. In the wild, they eat mostly young tender bamboo shoots and leaves, as well as some grasses, roots and fruits.

Lin receives treats from her keeper, Lissa, during an Animal Encounter (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Lin receives treats from her keeper, Lissa, during an Animal Encounter (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Want to meet our pandas up close and personal? Sign up for an Endangered Excursion where you’ll get to watch our talented red pandas create a one-of-a-kind canvas painting for you to take home and enjoy. That’s right, our pandas are painters! And you can purchase these unique masterpieces in the Zoo gift shop as well. Here’s a sneak peek of LiWu painting.

Red pandas are classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which means they face a high risk of extinction in the wild. Proceeds from the Endangered Excursions and the sales of red panda paintings support the Red Panda Network’s efforts to protect red pandas and their bamboo forests in the wild through the education and empowerment of local communities. The Red Panda Network’s immediate goal is the creation of Panchthar-Ilam-Taplejung Red Panda Protected Forest, located in Eastern Nepal, which will be the world’s first protected area dedicated to red panda.Red Panda Network

Next time you’re at the Zoo, be sure to stop by and visit our fuzzy faces!

See you soon, says Rover! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

See you soon, says Rover! (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

July 31, 2014   1 Comment