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Category — Zoo Volunteers

Come Meet the New Malayan Tigers on International Tiger Day

Our new Malayan tigers, Jalil (male) and Cinta (female), have made their public debut in Cat Canyon just in time for our International Tiger Day celebration. This Friday, July 29, Cat Canyon keepers and Zoo volunteers will be on hand at the Malayan tiger exhibit to share the latest news on our tigers and the need for tiger conservation. Throughout the day, there will be special presentations and activities for guests and tigers alike.

Jalil scopes out his new digs. (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Jalil scopes out his new digs. (Photo: Kathy Newton)

While we celebrate and increase awareness for tiger conservation here at the Zoo, we also continue to support tiger conservation in the wild through Panthera’s Tigers Forever program. In Malaysia, Panthera works with international partners to train local rangers to patrol forests, gather intelligence and arrest poachers in Taman Negara National Park and Endau-Rompin National Park.Panthera logo

Panthera employs cutting-edge technology in the fight against poaching. PoacherCams are motion-activated cameras that send real-time photos of people engaged in illegal activities to law enforcement. Thanks to these efforts, recent population monitoring data indicates that the tiger population is stable in Taman Negara and increasing in Endau-Rompin. Great news for Malayan tigers!

Cat Canyon keeper, Mike Land, talks to visitors about tigers (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

Cat Canyon keeper, Mike Land, talks to visitors about tigers (Photo: Crissi Lanier)

So come on out to the Zoo on Friday and celebrate with us! New this year, our vendor will offer discounts on tiger face painting to support the event so you can take your tiger fandom to the next level.

Tiger fans! (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

Tiger fans! (Photo: Cassandre Crawford)

July 27, 2016   No Comments

Pollen Nation: Helping Out Honeybees

Here at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, we are embracing the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Honeybees do more than just pollinate flowers and make honey. They also pollinate a third of the world’s crops and are critical to our agricultural system. Their populations, however, are in severe decline.

Honeybees

Honeybees

Here is where Pollen Nation, the newest group of beekeepers, steps in. A diverse group of Zoo staff and volunteers, Pollen Nation was established in 2014 to promote pollinator awareness by re-wilding habitats and inspiring action while connecting the community to nature.  “We’re not just beekeepers, we’re a group of people passionate about all aspects of a healthy ecological system…down to every little detail, including the honeybee,” says Melanie Evans, one of Pollen Nation’s founders.

Pollen Nation logo

Pollen Nation has established 18 honeybee hives on the “EcOhio Farm,” a portion of the Zoo’s 600-acre off-site property in Warren County. The hives will boost the declining honeybee population and also raise awareness about conservation action that can be taken in one’s own backyard. Though it may take a few years for the colonies to establish themselves before we can extract honey, eventually we expect to sell honey produced from the hives in the Zoo Shop.

Checking on a beehive at EcOhio Farm

Checking on a beehive at EcOhio Farm

How can you get involved and help out honeybees?

  • Come see the new beehive on Zoo grounds across from the World of the Insect building. Learn more about bees during Honeybee Chats at 2:00pm on Fridays through Tuesdays. Chats will wrap up at the end of October and start up again in spring.

    Honeybee Chat at the Zoo

    Honeybee Chat at the Zoo

  • Sign up for an Education Program series on honeybees that will be led by Pollen Nation members in January. Details to be posted soon at http://cincinnatizoo.org/education/.
  • Help us learn more about bees in the greater Cincinnati area. Simply snap pictures of bees that you see and submit to beespotter.org/cincinnatizoo with the date and location. An expert scientist from the Entomology Department at the University of Illinois will identify the species and add it to the database, helping us to further understand bee species demographics in our area. We are currently developing an app that should launch in spring.beespotter-logo-2015
  • Follow Pollen Nation on Facebook to learn about honeybees and keep up with our activities.
  • Plant native and pollinator-friendly vegetation such as milkweed, sunflowers, bee balm, and other wildflowers for bees to pollinate in your own backyard.
  • Limit pesticide use in your gardens and don’t use during mid-day hours when honeybees are most active. Consider choosing natural pesticides or home-made remedies.

What will the bees do over the winter? In about two weeks, we will winterize the hives where the bees will hunker down. We plan to stack hay bales near the hives as wind barriers and ensure there is enough honey for the bees to feed on to survive the winter.  The bees themselves will make their own sort of caulking, called propolis, to seal off the hive’s seams and keep the cold air out. After that, we’ll leave them alone until it’s time to re-emerge in April and get back to work.

How can you spot a honeybee?

About ½-inch long, honeybees have slender, slightly fuzzy abdomens that are pointed at the tip, and they have an obvious striping pattern. (Photo: Brad Smith)

About ½-inch long, honeybees have slender, slightly fuzzy abdomens that are pointed at the tip, and they have an obvious striping pattern. (Photo: Brad Smith)

Bumblebees are bigger, pudgier, furrier and have rounded tips to their abdomens, and they don’t have many stripes. (Photo: Mark Robinson)

Bumblebees are bigger, pudgier, furrier and have rounded tips to their abdomens, and they don’t have many stripes. (Photo: Mark Robinson)

Wasps and hornets are similar in size and color, but they have smooth, narrow abdomens with no hair.

Wasps and hornets are similar in size and color, but they have smooth, narrow abdomens with no hair.

 

October 16, 2015   1 Comment

Coming Up: Rhino Awareness Days and Bowling for Rhinos

Rhino Awareness Days

World Rhino Day falls on a Tuesday this year, September 22, so the Zoo is going to celebrate Rhino Awareness Days, free with regular Zoo admission, the following weekend. From 10:00 to 3:00 on September 26 and 27, guests are invited to learn more about rhinos and how we can help save them in the wild.

World Rhino Day logo

CREW Volunteers will be on hand at the Sumatran rhino exhibit to tell Harapan’s story, the last Sumatran rhino on exhibit in the United States. Here guests can catch a last glimpse of Harapan before he leaves for Indonesia and wish him well on his journey. With less than 100 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth, Harapan will move to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary where he will have the opportunity to breed and contribute to his species’ survival. His departure marks the end of an era for the Cincinnati Zoo’s Sumatran rhino breeding program, the only captive breeding program in the United States to produce calves for this critically endangered species. An exact date for Harapan’s departure has not been set, but the Zoo is pushing for the move to happen this fall. Until then, guests can visit him in Wildlife Canyon daily from 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., weather permitting.

Speaking of Harapan’s departure, there’s exciting news about his brother, and Cincinnati Zoo born Sumatran rhino, Andalas. The critically-endangered Sumatran rhino population will soon increase by one.  In a species with fewer than 100 individuals left on the planet, one is a significant number. Andalas and Ratu are expecting a calf in May 2016. Learn more and see ultra sound images here

We're going to miss Harapan's adorable face and hope the females in Indonesia find him irresistible!  (Photo: Kathy Newton)

We’re going to miss Harapan’s adorable face and hope the females in Indonesia find him irresistible! (Photo: Kathy Newton)

On the other side of the Zoo, guests can engage with Volunteer Educators at the CREW Wild Discover Zone to learn more about all of our rhino research programs. CREW is currently undertaking a project to expand access and build capacity for African and Asian rhino reproductive care within North American zoological facilities. The Zone is set up next to the Indian and black rhino exhibits where guests might get the chance to say hello to our newest rhino resident, a black rhino male named Faru.

Faru is doing great here in his new home and his training is going very well. The keepers are working with him to present both sides of his body  on cue and open his mouth to allow them to check his teeth and tongue. This allows them to perform basic foot care, daily baths, and administer medical care when needed with minimal stress to Faru. He and the female, Seyia, are still getting to know each other, and the hope is to put them together for breeding later this fall.

Welcome Faru to the Zoo! (Photo: Mark Dumont)

Welcome Faru to the Zoo! (Photo: Mark Dumont)

The keepers are also working with CREW to determine the reproductive cycle of our one and only Indian rhino, Manjula, using ultrasound and urine analysis. Manjula is chute-trained, target-trained, and she will hold her mouth open while they shine a flashlight inside to check everything. This training has been essential to administering the hormone to help her ovulate and also give the anesthetics used for her standing sedation procedures- both of which she does willingly and cooperatively! The plan is to artificially inseminate Manjula. The keepers are also currently working on blood draw training and teaching Manjula to stand her rear feet in rubber tubs for a foot soak. (Indian rhinos are prone to foot issues.)

Manjula, Indian rhino (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Manjula, Indian rhino (Photo: Kathy Newton)

Bowling for Rhinos

What else can you do to help save rhinos? Go bowling! The Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the American Association of Zoo Keepers is holding its second annual Bowling for Rhinos event on October 17 to raise awareness and funds for rhino conservation.To be held from 6:00 to 8:30 at Stone Lanes in Norwood, the event is sure to be tons of fun! In addition to bowling, there will be t-shirts for sale, a silent auction and a raffle to meet a rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo! Buy your tickets online now before they sell out!

Bowling for Rhinos 2015 flyer

September 24, 2015   No Comments