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American Burying Beetle Reintroduction

On May 24th The Cincinnati Zoo will be releasing over 100 pairs of American burying beetles (ABBs) at the nearby Fernald Nature preserve. These beetles were reared at the Cincinnati Zoo by insectarium staff, interns, volunteers and students. They are the offspring of wild collected beetles from Nebraska. The ABB was once found everywhere in the eastern United States but because of a handful of issues (habitat destruction, increased scavenger populations, etc.) they are now only found in a few counties in a few states. The Cincinnati Zoo has partnered with the US Fish & Wildlife service and the Fernald Nature Preserve to help bring this strange but important, endangered insect back to Ohio.

A Zoo Academy student helping to rear the endangered American Burying Beetle!

A Zoo Academy student helping to rear the endangered American Burying Beetle!

This is the 4th year of reintroductions held at Fernald. We are also planning a second release of about 50 pairs of ABBs in early July. After this year we will have placed over 600 adult ABBs at Fernald in an attempt to found a wild population. 

This is a brand new beetle raised at the Cincinnati Zoo

This is a brand new beetle raised at the Cincinnati Zoo

When we release the beetles we actually set them up to breed right away so that each pair of beetles can create up to 40 offspring. It’s called a burying beetle for a reason! These ABBs will locate small animal carcasses and bury them a foot deep overnight and then raise their young on the carcass. Check-ups and post release monitoring have shown us that the beetles are breeding and creating hundreds of larvae, but unfortunately we have yet to find any adult ABBs that have over-wintered on site at Fernald. That may sound dismal, but it is my opinion that they are just dispersing beyond our ability to survey for them. These beetles can fly up to 2 miles in one night! This year however we are holding two separate reintroductions to see if it will affect their over-wintering success and their dispersal rate. We also hope to partner with neighboring parks and wildlife areas to expand our survey efforts.

The rearing facility at the zoo. Each container houses a single beetle. Pink for girls and blue for boys.

The rearing facility at the zoo. Each container houses a single beetle. Pink for girls and blue for boys.

Join the Cincinnati Zoo on June 18th from 2pm-4pm at the Fernald Nature Preserve’s Visitor’s Center for a presentation about all things ABB! I’ll be bringing specimens and going over the animal’s natural history and the reintroduction efforts. We will also be hiking out to a pit-fall trap to see what we caught overnight with crossed fingers that there might be an American burying beetle waiting in the trap!

The release site at the Fernald Preserve

The release site at the Fernald Preserve

Click here to learn more about ABBs.

May 16, 2016   No Comments

International Migratory Bird Day: Get Outside and Go Birding!

Each year, International Migratory Bird Day is celebrated on the second Saturday in May, just as the orioles, warblers, tanagers and hummingbirds are returning to Cincinnati. About 200 bird species fly south to Central and South America in search of nourishment during the winter. In the spring, they return to the United States and Canada to breed and raise a family when the days are long and our backyards are bursting with insects, flowers, and fruits to eat. Some stay in Ohio for the summer, but many just stop to rest and feed along the way.

Chestnut sided warbler (Photo: Dave Jenike)

Chestnut sided warbler (Photo: Dave Jenike)

What better way is there to celebrate the return of our migratory birds than to get outside and go birding? Birdwatching is a great way to connect with nature and learn more about the wildlife around you. Grab some binoculars, a field guide and a notebook to record your sightings and get outside!

Birding is a great family activity!

Birding is a great family activity!

In addition to our local parks, wetlands and woodlands, the Zoo is a fantastic place to see native birds. Our lushly planted grounds, featuring a diversity of native trees and plants, attract plenty of winged wonders from warblers to waterfowl to raptors. Last year, I even personally witnessed a bald eagle flying over the Zoo. Be on the lookout especially along the edge of Swan Lake, by the Native Plants Garden, and in the Wolf Woods exhibit area. Who says the Zoo is just for viewing exotic wildlife?

Mama wood duck and her ducklings on Swan Lake (Photo: Jeff McCurry)

Mama wood duck and her ducklings on Swan Lake (Photo: Jeff McCurry)

Migratory birds face many challenges along their journey, one of which is finding safe places to rest and refuel on the way. Why not make your space a more bird-friendly place? Whether you have a large backyard or just an apartment window, you can make a difference. For example, you can go wild by landscaping your yard with native trees, bushes and flowers or simply offer native plants in window boxes. Set up bird feeders and baths, and keep your cat indoors (these non-natural predators kill billions of birds every year).

Goldfinch at a bird feeder

Goldfinch at a bird feeder

Here at the Zoo, we have embarked on a two-year process of renovating the public space within the Wings of the World exhibit (aka Bird House) to enhance our ability to connect guests to nature through our feathered friends and encourage them to become better bird neighbors. Though you won’t see any permanent changes to the building until next spring, we are well into the research and planning stages, and we’d love to hear from you.

  • How would you describe your connection to birds?
  • Do you have a great bird story to share?
  • What do you think we could do in the bird house to arouse your interest in birds and motivate you to become more aware of what’s going on in the bird world around you?

Your feedback will help us create the best experience possible!

(This project is made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.)

May 14, 2016   No Comments

Celebrate and Support Ocelot Conservation at Cinco de Gato this Sunday

With a population of fewer than 80 individuals, the endangered Texas ocelot needs our help, and here’s your chance to contribute. The Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the American Association of Zoo Keepers (AAZK) will hold its second annual Cinco de Gato event this Sunday, May 15, between 4:00pm and 7:00pm at Ladder 19 at 2701 Vine St (just 5 minutes from the Zoo).

CincoDeGatoPoster_2Edit

Come hungry and thirsty as Ladder 19 has generously offered to donate a portion of food and drink sales to the cause. You’ll have the opportunity to purchase ocelot-themed merchandise including earrings, magnets painted by an ocelot, Cinco de Gato t-shirts, and more.

There will also be fantastic items raffled off and sold via silent auction, including a behind-the-scenes experience with the Zoo’s Cat Ambassador Program. Come early and you might get the chance to meet a special animal ambassador or two!

Sihil, the Zoo's ambassador ocelot (Photo: Mark Dumont)

Sihil, the Zoo’s ambassador ocelot (Photo: Mark Dumont)

Admission to the event is free! Funds raised will support ocelot conservation through the Friends of Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in South Texas. So come on out for some great fun, food and drinks!

May 11, 2016   1 Comment