Random header image... Refresh for more!

Cincinnati Zoo Gives Back

On Saturday, November 22, thirty Zoo employees with their families joined another twenty volunteers from our Avondale neighborhood to pack up 225 boxes filled with all the ingredients to create a fresh, full, Thanksgiving meal. The boxes were passed out to children and their families from Rockdale Academy, South Avondale Elementary, and the SO-ACT Senior Citizen Group, giving them a hand up to kick off this holiday season and us the opportunity to show our support for our community.

Thanksgiving Food Drive

This 4th Annual Thanksgiving Food Drive was organized by Avondale’s Avenue District Block Club, of which the Zoo is a member. Almost every department in the Zoo, along with some of our great partners such as HGC Construction and Keep Cincinnati Beautiful, donated enough funds to support the cost of 150 meals. An overwhelming response from other local institutions and individuals helped us reach the final count of 225 meals. Those donors include:

  • Habitat for Humanity of Greater Cincinnati
  • The Community Builders
  • Ronald McDonald House Charities
  • Avondale Community Council (ACC)
  • Avondale Comprehensive Development Corporation
  • The Community Builders (TCB), LISC (Local Initiates Support Corporation)
  • Uptown Consortium
  • Lincoln Ware Walking Club
  • Avondale Running Club
  • PES Marketing

Boxes donated by Two Men and a Truck and RR Donnelly West Chester were stuffed with a 15lb turkey and all the fixings for a hearty Thanksgiving feast. Many thanks to the Avondale Youth Council for doing all of the shopping for us, as well as putting together all 225 boxes.

6thanksgivingDrive2014_FiaC

Sheila Holmes Howard, President and Secretary of AADBC shares, “I am so thankful for the generous outpouring of support from folks who truly care and who continually give back to our community. This is HUGE! It is totally awesome! AADBC and ACC thank everyone who unselfishly gives their time, talents and money”.

17thanksgivingDrive2014_FiaC

The Cincinnati Zoo is committed not only to the conservation of wildlife, but to serving our community as a part of our mission. By providing our community with the resources and tools they need to live a healthy and sustainable life, we not only strengthen our relationship with them, but empower them to save money, save resources and instill pride within their homes and our neighborhoods. Our staff was thankful to be part of such a generous and meaningful event to kick off this holiday season.

18thanksgivingDrive2014_FiaC

December 8, 2014   No Comments

Animal Care Internship Program

So you want to be a zookeeper.

Fall 2014 interns hanging out with Tommy the cheetah.

Fall 2014 interns hanging out with Tommy the cheetah.

Have you always wanted to work with animals?  Do you have a passion for conservation?  If the answers are yes, then you are well on your way.  As with many careers these days, job-seeking in the zoo world has become very competitive.  It is sometimes particularly hard to get experience working with animals.  In addition, many positions require a bachelor’s degree in Zoology, Biology, or a related field of study.  The best way to get experience is to apply for an internship with animals.

The Cincinnati Zoo has recently re-vamped our animal care internship program.  The traditional internship has been reinvented as the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden Animal Keeping Training Course.  The training course lasts 16-weeks (40 hours per week unpaid, un-benefited) and occurs Summer, Fall, and Winter.  The positions encompass the education of skilled professional and technical work in the routine daily care of assigned animals, enclosures and related facilities within a particular animal department.

Summer intern Jenny training a Savanna Monitor.

Summer intern Jenny training a Savanna Monitor.

Through goals set by interns and staff, each intern follows a curriculum designed to provide a basic skill set and experience for becoming an animal keeper in an AZA institution.  Each week a new topic is presented and discussed.  Topics include (but aren’t limited to) basic husbandry, operant conditioning, enrichment, nutrition, veterinary care, public speaking and presentations, green practices and conservation, and job-seeking/interview skills.  Interns are responsible for completing 4 separate projects related directly to the animals they will be caring for.  Mid-session and final reviews are conducted in order to provide each intern with constructive feedback about their contribution to the internship.

If you think this internship matches your goals in life, you will need to meet the following requirements in order to apply: 1) Current college junior or senior working toward an animal related degree, Biology, Zoology etc.; or within one year of graduation with a related degree. 2) Demonstrate commitment to working with wildlife in a zoo setting. 3) Comfortable working with a diverse collection encompassing all classes of animals.

As testament to the strength of this training course, one of our past interns gave us this feedback: “This internship has definitely been one of the best experiences of my life!  I have learned so much thanks to the generosity and time of others.  All of the topics covered facilitated my professional growth and has solidified my desire to be a zookeeper.  This internship, with its well-developed curriculum should set the bar for internships in zoos across the country.”  Wow!  What an amazing compliment.  However, we will never rest on our laurels, continuing always to improve and modify the content in order to provide the best experience possible.

Summer intern Amanda with her enrichment project, the “Snake Slalom.”

Summer intern Amanda with her enrichment project, the “Snake Slalom.”

So if you have the desire, educational background, and commitment to work with animals in a zoo setting, apply for the Zoo’s Animal Keeping Training Course.  We are currently accepting applications for the winter section.  Check out www.cincinnatizoo.org/about-us/job-opportunities/ for more information and to apply.  This is an amazing opportunity to get animal care experience at a world class institution!

November 25, 2014   No Comments

Do You Know the Potto?

Everyone is familiar with primates like gorillas, monkeys and even lemurs, but not too many people know of the potto. So what’s a potto, you say? Pottos are prosimians, which are primitive primates, not as highly evolved as monkeys but sharing many of the same characteristics (fingernails and toenails, stereoscopic vision, forward facing eyes, etc.). Some other prosimians include lemurs, lorises, bushbabies, tarsiers and aye-ayes.

gabriel_fia

Gabriel the potto. Photo by Sophia Cifuentes

The Cincinnati Zoo is one of very few zoos around the world to exhibit pottos, not because they are endangered, but more because of their nocturnal way of life. Many zoos do not have a building like our Night Hunters exhibit in which the day / night light cycle is reversed. This allows us to exhibit nocturnal creatures under subdued blue lighting during the time our guests visit and then fill the exhibits with white lighting when our guests have left.

In early 2014, there were only 16 pottos in four zoos in the United States—Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, Milwaukee County Zoo, Franklin Park Zoo and Cincinnati Zoo, of course. We have maintained pottos in our collection since the mid-1960s when we first opened the former Nocturnal House. We have been one of the top breeders of these African primates and we currently have seven pottos at the Zoo. Recently, it became clear that if we wanted to keep these charismatic animals in U.S. zoo collections, then we needed to have a plan to maximize the potential of our small population with regards to breeding and to also recruit more zoos to commit to exhibiting them as the potto population grew.

Baby potto

Baby potto

The Mammal Curators of the zoos holding pottos were all on board with the desire to continue to work with this species. The pedigree information of the U.S. population of pottos was run through a computer software program that provided us with the best possible pairings from our small group in order to maximize genetic diversity. From that information it became clear that in order to achieve our goal, 12 of the 16 pottos needed to move in order to create the pairings recommended. We also needed one more facility to join us to provide the extra space needed to ultimately put together the seven potential breeding pairs indicated by our “computer dating” service. The Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha, Nebraska stepped up to become the fifth zoo in the U.S. to maintain pottos.

potto_gabriel

By mid-summer, the five zoos had committed to making the necessary moves to have all the transfers completed before cold weather might become an issue for transportation. Of the six animals we originally had here in Cincinnati, four have transferred to other zoos while five new pottos arrived. We now have three pairs as well as a young male who will serve as a companion animal to an aging bamboo lemur. The other zoos involved with pottos will either have one pair (Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and the Henry Doorly Zoo) or two pairs (Franklin Park Zoo). The Milwaukee County Zoo, which is now holding a single young female potto, is attempting to import a young male potto from Africa, which will provide new genetics to our population as well as provide us with yet another pair of animals for breeding.

It has been very gratifying to see how well the five zoos have worked so quickly and cooperatively towards our common goal to maintain a healthy potto population. Though the potto may not be an endangered species, we would hate to lose this charismatic creature from our collections. Many Cincinnatians have met our potto, Gabriel, at the Zoo or at events around the city. I like to think that it’s because of this ambassador animal that more Cincinnatians know what a potto is than people in any other part of the country.

October 9, 2014   No Comments